Tag Archives: Chili

Beans or No Beans Chili Brouhaha

chiliby Steven Doyle

Temperatures are dropping this week and many of you will be seeking out  great bowl of chili. We have some to recommend. We also have the tale of the original chili cook off in Terlingua if you are interested in any more history today. This article was read last week on the main stage of The Original International Chili Cook Off held in Terlingua each year, which we are honored. That cook off is always held in Terlingua the first week of November.

In the past few week we have been discussing the perfect bowl of red, as we do each year about this time. It is certainly something we enjoy and take to heart as a true Texas original. However, it has been disturbing as each one of these conversations always ends with a debate on “beans or no beans”.  Our stance stays true to the no beans camp. We have a few original chili recipes to prove that this is the way God intended chili to be served. Beans may join the table as a condiment, just as you might add fresh brunoise of onions, or even Fritos to make your own pie.     Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Crave, Steven Doyle

The Chili Queens of San Antonio

chili1

From the 1860s until the late 1930s, one of the primary amusements of both visitors and locals was the food and entertainment offered in the plazas of San Antonio by the Chili Queens.

These women served chili con carne and other Mexican American delicacies from dusk until dawn at various San Antonio plazas over the years — setting up tables and benches and bringing pots of food to cook or reheat over their flickering mesquite fires and to serve by the light of their oil lanterns. As morning came, their families helped them cart everything away. Wandering musicians and singers provided a festive air to the unique proceedings—unique, that is, outside Mexico. In Mexico, the open-air plaza restaurants were not celebrated for their charming food-servers. Only San Antonio had Chili Queens—and while they liked to joke, banter, and flirt with customers, they were well chaperoned by family members who guarded their virtue.

At first, only a few women — such as Sadie and Martha, sometimes pictured in old books about San Antonio — were called Chili Queens. Sadie was called “Anglo-Celtic;” Martha was Hispanic. Eventually, the royal title was applied to all the women—most of them young and virtually all of them Hispanic.   Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Steven Doyle

10 Best Places In Dallas For Chili

terlingua2by Steven Doyle

A true bowl of Texas red is near and dear to me, and I am always willing to order a bowl if found on any menu I stumble across. I am pleased to report that there are more chili offerings this year than last, and many have upped the ante in developing a perfect bowl. With temperatures dipping into below freezing ranges in the coming days, what a perfect opportunity to go out and taste a bowl for yourself.  We have a list of some of the best in Dallas, and even one from Fort Worth that you will want to sample.

If you are curious how the chili cook off in Terlingua came to be, you might want to check out this link: The Colorful History of the Chili Cook Off.    Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Steven Doyle

Stephan Pyles’ Stampede 66 Tastes Like Texas

28_2012_08_ARC_Texarkana_Shelter-9249

photo by Robert Bostick

by Steven Doyle

There are few restaurants in the Dallas area that speak to its Texas roots as Stephan Pyle’s restaurant Stampede 66 located in its sprawling digs as big as Texas itself in the tony base of the Park 17 on the southern most cusp of Uptown. Here you will witness a sultry West Texas big sky as you dine on refined vittles under the moonlit caricature Pyles has created. Nothing is business as usual in the Pyles world; instead things are larger than life as honorably displayed on large platters of fried chicken oozing honey, or v-shelved tacos filled with rich and meaty brisket or delicately fried Gulf oysters.

Stampede is where locals and tourists alike get to play JR Ewing to a fanciful version of chicken fried steak. Executive Chef Jon Thompson calls this menu “Modern Texan, but we call it dinner. Things are kicked up a few levels at Stampede as evidenced by the shrimp and grits dotted with a largish sphere of condensed shrimp broth that is to be macerated in the bowl to create this explosive flavor bomb. An unusual touch that begs for another bite.    Continue reading

4 Comments

Filed under Stephan Pyles

What Is The Detroit Chili At Pop Diner?

DSC05862by Steven Doyle

Pop Diner is this new and over-the-top 24-hour diner in Uptown Dallas. One of the last tenants to fill the Borders Books location the diner serves breakfast and diner fare all through the day and in the dark stretches of the morning hours. The owner, Nik Gjonaj, is originally from Detroit where he owns a successful chain of steakhouses called Luca’s Chophouse. Detroit is where his roots are, but he now divides his time between Texas and Michigan.

Detroit has their own style of cuisine that is a different take on many items we serve in Dallas, such as the hot dog. The Michigan dog is a definite style of dog you find primarily in that state, but seldom referred to it as such. That term is used by other states to describe the steamed dog, steamed bun and a rich beefy sauce. A coney if you with chile con carne.    Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Chili, Steven Doyle, Uptown

The Hunt For A Bowl Of Red: The Windmill Lounge

windmillby Steven Doyle   photo by Robert Bostick

If you ever wander in the bartender’s inner circle you will soon find that Charlie Papaceno from the Windmill Lounge is considered the bartender’s bartender. Charlie is not only a mentor but an all-around guy who happens to be a master behind the bar. He was making these cool cocktails with significant historical value before it was fashionable. The displaced New Yorker can also make a mean bowl of red.       Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Hunt for a Bowl of red, Steven Doyle

The Hunt For A Bowl Of Red: The Fatted Calf

IMG_5145by Bryan Coonrod

In our search for the perfect bowl of red, we asked contributor Bryan Coonrod to chime in on one of his favorite chili bowls in the DFW area. Bryan is one of the area’s hottest DJ’s in Dallas and has a voracious appetite.

One of my favorite suburban cities to dine in is Rockwall just east of Dallas on I-30 . You can find several of the top restaurants in the area here such as Ava, Zanata, Culpepper’s and The Fatted Calf where we end up today to try their Texas Red Chili. Chef-Owner Ted Grieb runs this establishment and delivers some awesome food time and time again, which you can tell by the full dining room we saw today. The chili here is quite the serving; a large bowl that you can call Texas-sized.  Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Bryan Coonrod, Hunt for a Bowl of red