Corral Corrientes 348

grill cookingby Steven Doyle

In a city where meat is king and steakhouses are landing faster than the Bugatti Veyron, it is refreshing to find something a bit out of the ordinary. Meet Corrientes 348, the new Argentinian steakhouse located in the former Stephan Pyles vast location on Ross Avenue.

Argentinians have a fondness for meat, or rather an “asado” or “parrillada.” Meats are cooked on a parilla (grill) while attendees enjoy socializing and drinking wine, typically a Malbec. Parrilla culture is largely about patience and enjoying the company they keep. Staying true to their roots, the restaurant will have a dramatic open flame parilla (custom-made in South America) anchoring the main dining room with 20 seats surrounding it. 

DSC02325

 

Corrientes 348 brings that culture to your table. The menu is large and a joy to peruse with vastly different items to choose from.  Start your meal with meaty or vegetarian empanadas. We enjoyed the beefy empanada loaded with egg, green olives and fresh herbs. But thoroughly enjoyed the Morcilla, little grilled blood sausages that are tender with large sparks of flavor fresh off the grill. However, you will not wish to overlook the Queso de Parrilla, or grilled cheese which is a slab of fresh cheese that saunters on a blazing cast iron plate. The dish is served table side as the staff slices the cheese which has a slight honey glaze. The result is simply wonderful and not to be missed.

The meat list is vast who’s who of beef with a smattering of pork and fish available. Half orders are available, and if it is merely a couple dining this is highly suggested. Please consider also dining family-style to get maximum enjoyment from your Corrientes visit.

Housemade Empanadas - even the dough is made in-houseEmpanadas

DSC02332Queso de Parrilla

DSC02329Morcilla

Do sample the rack of lamb, generously served sliced on a platter and incredibly delicious with its flame kissed goodness. Consider the Lomito Light which are portions of tenderloin served with a charred slice of pineapple for good measure. Tenderly prepared and quite delicious, especially with a splash of the requisite chimichurri. In fact, the house-made chimichurri should go on most of the menu and is offered freely.

One of our favorites on the menu, and this surprised us, the Costillitas de Cerdo are meaty pork ribs that are enjoyably tender with an amazing char. Another must order for the table.

Sides are not an afterthought at Corrientes with plenty of rice, potato and other types of dishes all kicked up. The fried polenta is highly recommended. It is fashioned into sticks and given a shredded parmigiana treatment. Crispy and quite good. Comes in a full and half order. The full order will feed a huge group.

DSC02341Rack of Lamb

DSC02335Tenderloin

Parrillada de Carnes

We loved the wine list and recommend one of the Malbecs which will go very well with all the beef and cut through the powerful chimichurri. Also look for a few well chosen South American beers along with a handful of locals to enjoy.

If you are curious, as we were, about the unusual name, we have that story. Corrientes refers to the famed street in Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina. Corrientes 348 is an address mentioned in the famous tango, “A Media Luz” sung by Carlos Gardel (a famous Argentinian musician in the 1920’s).

The first Corrientes 348 restaurant was opened in South America, in 1997 by Eduardo Santalla (a native of Argentina) He found a vacant restaurant that coincidentally had the address of 348, remembered Gardel’s tango and the rest is history. This family-owned business was purchased in 2014 by Jair Coser; Boiani and Demartini joined the group to bring the concept to Dallas. There are currently 7 in South America with Dallas being the first United States location.

Corrientes 348 now serves lunch.

1 Comment

Filed under Crave, Steven Doyle

One response to “Corral Corrientes 348

  1. Bill

    This is good place and hope the word gets out as it has been pretty empty each time I gone.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s