Tag Archives: Wineries

A Winos Guide To The U.S. 290 Wine Road – Caveat Emptor

wine1by Andrew Chalk

You have toured Napa’s famed Highway 29, right? The wine trail where it takes 45 minutes to cross the road in the summer (such is the traffic)? Well, an attraction billing itself as the “#2 Wine Destination in America” is taking shape just south of Dallas. It is the “290 wine trail” or “Wine Road 290”.

The term “290 wine trail” is my own. The name refers to the stretch of U.S. 290 between Fredericksburg and Johnson City.

The term “Wine Road 290” is copyrighted and owned by a corporation with the following details:   Continue reading

30 Comments

Filed under Andrew Chalk

New Texas Winery Association Formed To Promote Texas Wine Quality

carousel_picnic-on-lawnby Andrew Chalk

Texas Fine Wine” is a new association of wineries in the state formed to promote quality Texas wine. Its founding members are four of Texas’ best wineries: Bending Branch Winery, Brennan Vineyards, Duchman Family Winery and Pedernales Cellars. The founders plan to get the organization up and running (mainly through through promotional events for the trade, public and media) in the first year, and then open up membership to all Texas wineries with a quality-oriented philosophy.

That philosophy will, of course, include a commitment to use Texas grapes whenever possible. More significantly, it will include a commitment to label wines with the correct place of grape origin. For example, if a Texas winery sells a wine made from California grapes, they would label it ‘American’, consistent with Federal wine labeling law. This is the first time, to my knowledge, that a wine producer group in Texas has come out so unambiguously as a body in favor of honest labeling of Texas wine.

Writers and consumers have pressed for the industry to take this approach for years. Many individual wineries have adopted the practice already. It is a sign of the maturing of the industry that a producer organization can now endorse it.      Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Andrew Chalk