Tag Archives: Seafood Shack

Seafood Shack For Lent

seafood-shack1by Steven Doyle

I am not Catholic or Lutheran so I do not fully grasp the whole Lent concept. I know from an outsider’s point of view that there is some fasting and penance going on, so that would pretty much leave me out of that whole business. There is also  something called Joyous Saturday, but aren’t all Saturdays joyous? Mine certainly are.

Then we have all these pre-Lenten activities which is an opportunity for excess. This makes the whole season seem much more appetizing for those of us on the outside of things. Mardi Gras could create converts, to be sure.

Catholics over the age of 14 are required to abstain from meat and from food made with meat. With that, this is the busiest time of year for our local fishmongers.    Continue reading

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Eight Favorite Ceviches in Dallas

Baja-Ceviche-H-1024x576by Steven Doyle

Ceviche is seafood prepared in a centuries old method of cooking by contact with the acidic juice of citrus juice instead of heat. The preparation and consumption of ceviche is practically a religion in parts of Mexico, Central, and South America, and it seems as though there are as many varieties of ceviche as people who eat it.  It can be eaten as a first course or main dish, depending on what is served with it.

The chemical process that occurs when the acid of the citrus comes in contact with the fish is similar what happens when the fish is cooked, and the flesh becomes opaque and firm.   Continue reading

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Seafood Shack Still Full of Surprises

seafood-shack1by Steven Doyle

Seafood Shack on Webbs Chapel very near Forest Lane has been a long tradition for lunch, with big flavors that are fairly easy on the wallet. So is true for the newer and prettier version located on Northwest Highway and Marsh Lane. The latter offers a full bar, an airy patio and many more seats.

A recent visit for dinner netted some great finds included what they called fried octopus, which gave us odd visions of a heavy battered fish. Instead, we found the dish to be light with a crispy sautee, punctuated with chunks of onion and tomato. This dish fell supreme on our palate.   Continue reading

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