Tag Archives: History

Ten Great Nachos Found in Dallas

nachoby Steven Doyle

Nachos originated in the city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico, just over the border from Eagle Pass, Texas. In 1943, the wives of U.S. soldiers stationed at Fort Duncan in nearby Eagle Pass were in Piedras Negras on a shopping trip and arrived at the restaurant after it had already closed for the day. The maître d’hôtel, Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya, invented a new snack for them with what little he had available in the kitchen: tortillas and cheese. Anaya cut the tortillas into triangles, fried them, added shredded cheddar cheese, quickly heated them, added sliced pickled jalapeño peppers, and served them.  Continue reading

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A Week of Celebration Honoring Texas Chicken Fried Steak Day

cfs jesusby Steven Doyle

We are in celebration mode this week as we seek out the very best Chicken Fried Steaks in the DFW area and around the state of Texas. It is research that is heartfelt, and I am sure our system is feeling all the fried beef we have consumed for the large list we will present last in the week as we pay homage to Texas Chicken Fried Steak Day.

Chicken-fried steak is a dish in which a cut of beef, usually thin and selected from the round, is breaded and fried. (Occasionally, some restaurants have also cooked a cut of pork.) The method of preparation is similar to that of fried chicken, which explains the name. The Texas staple is most often served with mashed potatoes and covered with cream gravy. Continue reading

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Dallas Restaurants That Have A Beautiful Patina And A Spark Of History

prince4by Steven Doyle

Generations have celebrated certain restaurants in Dallas, enjoying the cuisine that made Dallas strong and certainly has given it character. Today we pay homage to a select handful of these Dallas classics and hope you will continue to enjoy them as time honors them with continued success.

I recall some old favorites including  Zeider Zee, The Beefeater, Prince of Burgers and Southern Kitchen. Perhaps you have some memories of restaurants that come to mind.
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Tortilla Factory and Restaurant is Filled with History

luna1by Steven Doyle

In a time when women were kept at home and away from the workplace Maria Luna, who at the time was a single parent, rose from the kitchen to create her mark on Dallas history with Luna’s Tortilla Factory. A strong and devoted woman Luna gathered local women to crush her nixtamal , or corn that would become masa. Once gathered from Luna had the masa formed into tortillas and tamales which became a business that is now 95 years old and run by her son and grandson, both named Fernando.

Maria Luna ran her business, originally located on McKinney Avenue near downtown on a block that Luna purchased in 1938 for about $50,000 and shared with the original El Fenix. There the family worked, living above the tortilla factory. This meant dedication. Maria never turned away a stranger in need of fresh tortillas regardless of the hour. The building has since been remodeled to accommodate Meso Maya, and is considered a historical landmark.  Continue reading

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Southern History of Fried Chicken

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Long before Julia Child, James Beard or Anthony Bourdain, Mary Randolph helped define American cuisine.

A Virginia-born member of a plantation-owning and slave-holding family, Randolph had prominent connections. For instance, according to Michigan State University’s Feeding America blog, her brother was married to Martha Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson’s daughter. But though Randolph’s life was largely like those of many other young women from plantation-owning familes—privately educated for wifehood, married at 18, having eight children in her lifetime—one of her interests had an outsize impact on broader American society. Randolph’s knowledge of how to party led her to write the first cookbook published in America. Continue reading

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The Brief and Colorful History of Breakfast Cereal

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Growing up in the United States chances are you did your share of watching Saturday morning cartoons while eating breakfast cereal. I grew up eating Cheerios, Grape Nuts, and Rice Krispies while many of my young friends enjoyed Cocoa Pebbles, Lucky Charms and Fruit Loops. The truly fortunate children were served from a variety pack filled with choices that only a child could understand. Was it always this way? History tells us no. In fact, cereal started out very different than the colorful kid-friendly boxes we buy today.

It may be hard to believe, with its endless flavor varieties and sugary additions, but cereal is one of the first widely marketed “health foods.” It was developed as an answer to a growing dyspepsia epidemic in America. During the Civil War, many suffered from this chronic digestion problem that resulted from the unhealthy, high-protein diets of the time. It was clear that eating habits had to change; doctors recognized a need for teaching Americans how to eat and live healthier. Institutions that emphasized exercise and a healthy diet, known as sanitariums, began popping up around the country. Continue reading

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History of Wings and Where to Find Them in Dallas

wing wingbucket

A good sports bar needs three things: beer on tap, a television on the wall and a menu that offers Buffalo wings. Wings can be found at nearly every Super Bowl party and barbecue outing in the country, and they are the favored excuse of businessmen who want to visit Hooters. Yet the greasy, finger-staining bar-food staple is only 45 years old. The Buffalo wing was invented in 1964, which makes it younger than Demi Moore, Johnny Depp — and even Barack Obama. On Sept. 5, Buffalo, N.Y., will hold its fourth annual National Buffalo Wing Festival, a two-day celebration for all things wing. But how did the spicy snack come about? And why is it served with celery? Continue reading

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